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Bloomfield, Staten Island

Bloomfield

Bloomfield is the neighborhood immediately north of Travis.  Originally named Daniell's Neck when it was first settled in the 17th century.  Later called Merrell Town after a local farmer.  The name Bloomfield first appeared on a map in 1874.

A large oil storage terminal maintained by Gulf Oil was built in the neighborhood in 1936.  The 442 acre terminal housed 82 tanks and was accessible by a service road of the West Shore Expressway which became Gulf Avenue.  The terminal closed in 1998 and the tanks were later demolished.

On February 9, 1973 a disaster occurred in Bloomfield with natural gas.  A TETCo storage tank (Texas Eastern Transmission Company) killed 40 employees.  A Hilton Hotel opened in Bloomfield in 2003.  A proposal in the 2000s to open a NASCAR racetrack in the former Gulf Oil site failed.

Bloomfield was site of the World's Largest Liquefied Gas Storage Tank. The Tank, a Property of the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation Blew Up in February of 1973 Killing 43 Workers. | The U.S. National Archives


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